Home / Food and Nutrition / This Is What That ‘Salmon-Safe’ Label Says About Your Wine Or Eggs : The Salt : NPR
1525253113 This Is What That Salmon Safe Label Says About Your Wine Or Eggs The Salt NPR - This Is What That 'Salmon-Safe' Label Says About Your Wine Or Eggs : The Salt : NPR

This Is What That ‘Salmon-Safe’ Label Says About Your Wine Or Eggs : The Salt : NPR

This Is What That ‘Salmon-Safe’ Label Says About Your Wine Or Eggs : The Salt : NPR

This Is What That Salmon Safe Label Says About Your Wine Or Eggs The Salt NPR - This Is What That'Salmon-Safe' Label Says About Your Wine Or Eggs : The Salt : NPR

The unique location of Wilcox Family Farms, an egg farm, is within the shadow of Mount Rainier.

Eilis O’Neill/KUOW


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Eilis O’Neill/KUOW

- This Is What That'Salmon-Safe' Label Says About Your Wine Or Eggs : The Salt : NPR

The unique location of Wilcox Family Farms, an egg farm, is within the shadow of Mount Rainier.

Eilis O’Neill/KUOW

In a large grass pasture within the shadow of Mount Rainier in Washington state, masses of chickens crowd round just a little space the place they may be able to get water and safe haven from the bald eagles circling overhead. This is the unique location of Wilcox Family Farms, an egg farm that still has places in Oregon and Montana.

Jim Wilcox says his farm did not all the time seem like this, however over the last 20 years, his consumers each at small, upscale grocery shops and at giant chains like Costco began asking numerous questions. They sought after to grasp whether or not Wilcox farms had been excellent stewards of the land. Whether that they had a excellent carbon footprint.

And this:

“Since we have so many waterways that we either border or run through our property, are we taking good care of those?” Wilcox recollects.

So the Wilcoxes began responding to these considerations. And they began accumulating labels: natural, all-natural, cage-free, non-GMO. All the ones certifications are meant to make consumers be ok with having a look out for his or her circle of relatives’s well being and protective the surroundings.

One of the eco-labels Wilcox Farms bought in recent times is “salmon-safe,” a label extra continuously observed on craft beer and Northwest wine bottles than egg cartons.

The Wilcoxes’ 1,500-acre farm borders the Nisqually River, which has runs of steelhead and salmon — and farming will also be onerous on fish. Think insecticides, irrigation drain on creeks and, Wilcox says, “with all these chickens, as you might imagine, we have tons and tons of fertilizer” — this is, hen manure.

Populations of salmon and steelhead within the Nisqually River had been declining for many years, and that is the reason an enormous fear for the Nisqually Tribe.

“When the first fish comes back, you thank that salmon for coming home and sustaining your life,” Billy Frank Jr. stated in an interview sooner than his loss of life in 2014. Frank used to be a member of the Nisqually Tribe and a mythical activist for tribal fishing rights.

1525253113 954 This Is What That Salmon Safe Label Says About Your Wine Or Eggs The Salt NPR - This Is What That'Salmon-Safe' Label Says About Your Wine Or Eggs : The Salt : NPR

Jim Wilcox is a fourth-generation egg farmer. His circle of relatives farm borders the Nisqually River in Washington state.

Eilis O’Neill/KUOW


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Eilis O’Neill/KUOW

- This Is What That'Salmon-Safe' Label Says About Your Wine Or Eggs : The Salt : NPR

Jim Wilcox is a fourth-generation egg farmer. His circle of relatives farm borders the Nisqually River in Washington state.

Eilis O’Neill/KUOW

“We can’t Band-Aid this watershed,” he stated of the Nisqually River. “We’ve got to think about it for all of us: for everyone to have clean water, quality and quantity of that water; to have salmon; to have trees; to have all that medicine out there.”

The method Wilcox tells it, Frank is a large reason why he determined to modify the best way he runs his farm. It used to be Frank who inspired Wilcox to prevent the use of insecticides, plant timber by means of waterways and stay hen manure out of the water. That would earn him a “salmon-safe” certification for his eggs. Wilcox says he determined “that’s where our future lay.”

The salmon-safe label used to be created within the overdue 1990s to take a look at to translate shopper passion in salmon into cash for farmers who did proper by means of fish.

“We started out working with vineyards in the Willamette Valley,” Dan Kent, government director of Salmon-Safe, recollects. Today, he says, greater than 800 farms from Alaska to Northern California have the certification, together with a 3rd of Oregon’s vineyards.

But issues have not labored out precisely as Kent had was hoping. Not sufficient shoppers know what salmon-safe method — and that suggests no longer sufficient are keen to pay extra for staple meals pieces like eggs that elevate the label. But a unique magnificence of consumers does know what salmon-safe method, and it’s : grocery shops.

“What we’ve learned over the years,” Kent says, “is that the real value we can deliver to certified landowners is market access.”

In different phrases, given the selection, positive high-end supermarkets lean towards salmon-safe choices. Kent says his subsequent function is to begin running with extra wheat, apple and dairy farmers to earn the certification and use it to marketplace their merchandise to grocery-store consumers.

Back at the Wilcox Farm, I climb into Jim’s outdated jeep. Its home windows roll down manually and its clock bears no courting to the real time.

“It’s kind of an old beater,” Jim admits. “You know, I take it on the old back roads.”

We bump over a rutted dust street to the Nisqually River, and Wilcox presentations me the place he and his sons and nephew are making plans to drag out a dike and let the river flood about 15 acres in their land.

“The river’s going to be allowed to just kind of meander in here,” he issues out the window, “and hopefully it will just create kind of a still water where little fingerlings and feeder-type fish can thrive.”

This tale involves us from member station KUOW and EarthFix, an environmental journalism collaboration led by means of Oregon Public Broadcasting in partnership with six different public media stations in Oregon, Washington and Idaho.

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